Photo Organization

Photo Organization for Efficient Social Media Posting

Have you ever wanted to post a certain picture on Instagram or Facebook, but you just can’t seem to find it? Most of us take photos daily and it can be tricky to organize the chaos of hundreds of pictures. Here are some tips to help you manage your photos, so you’ll have more time for making shareable content that engages your audience.

Know where your photos are

This is the foundation of posting consistently to social media. Not having your digital organization act together is enough to deter anyone from even trying. It is so disheartening to sit down to your computer with the intent of posting a week’s worth of content, only to spend your allotted time searching your crowded desktop-or worse, that bursting-at-the-seams downloads folder! The solution is to have a system for saving your images when you first create them! 

This is where Dropbox comes in. Another one, of course, is Google Drive-I don’t care which one you use, but your life will be easier if you submit to The Cloud! When you utilize an app like these which can be synced across devices, you will always be able to find the image that you need, regardless of which device you’re currently working on.

I recommend creating a separate folder, wherever you decide to house it, and calling it “Social Media Photos.” Within this folder, create a “Posted” and a “To Post” folder, so you’ll know if you’ve already posted something and which shots still need to be shared. Remember it is okay to post photos a second time, but knowing at a glance what is fresh content will be super helpful when you sit down to schedule your posts-saving you time!

Some photos are tied to an event or a time of year, others can be posted anytime. For this reason, I keep an “Evergreen” folder for this kind of content so I can use them when I am short on photos.

BONUS TIP: Develop a naming convention –  I love Canva and every time I save an image to my Dropbox (in my To Post folder) I make sure to name it the same way so it’s easy to find. If you have categories for your social posts, use them in the name of your image, then include a date or some other piece of data that will help you find it. For example, if you create an image for a blog, name it blogtitle07.18. This will automatically tell you what blog your image is for and the day you created the image. The key is to name it while you know exactly what it is, so you don’t have to wonder later!

Take lots of photos at one time

You may intend to take one photo to share in the moment. However, you can make that photo into several opportunities to post, just by changing up the angle or switching out a prop. This is how you build a library of evergreen content that you can use again and again!

BONUS TIP: Use your own photos in the background of your graphics to stand out from other people in your industry and to decrease your dependence on stock photos.

Create A System for Photo Batching

When you are editing a photo for one piece of content, duplicate it and size the image for other outlets as well. For example, when you write a blog post and have a featured photo sized just for that, duplicate that photo and save it in the dimensions ideal for Pinterest, Twitter, and even your newsletter so you have them ready when it’s time to schedule across platforms. (Save them in your shiny new To Post file!)

BONUS TIP: Canva For Work, the paid version, will automatically resize any image using the Magic Resize feature. You’ll still need to adjust some things, but it’s a time saver!

Once you have your photos where you know how to find them, you’ve take a bunch of extras, and you have a well-stocked “Evergreen” folder, you can use a social media scheduler to get your posts out there in no time! 

Now tell me, do you have a photo organization hack/tip/trick to share? I’m always looking for ways to systemize and save time-so I’d love to hear it in the comments!

1 Comments

  • Janette Schuster

    Informative post, Stacey!

    When I resize a photo to dimensions ideal for social media, I rename the edited photo accordingly for ease of identification and grouping. For example, I might add “Insta4to5” to the name of a photo intended for posting on Instagram at the optimal aspect ratio of 4:5. Since multiple photos within a single post all appear with the same ratio, I can easily spot photos labeled this way that will look good together within an Instagram post.

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